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Graded field microscopy

Graded-field microscopy is a general technique for obtaining phase-gradient contrast in biological tissue slices. The technique is based on introducing partial beam blocks in the illumination and detection apertures of a standard white-light widefield transillumination microscope. Depending on the relative aperture sizes, one block produces phase-gradient contrast while the other reduces brightfield background, allowing a full operating range between brightfield and darkfield contrast.


Publications Related to this Research Area

Graded-field microscopy with white light

Ran Yi, Kengyeh K. Chu, and Jerome Mertz,

Optics Express

We present a general imaging technique called graded-field microscopy for obtaining phase-gradient contrast in biological tissue slices. The technique is based on introducing partial beam blocks in the illumination and detection apertures of a standard white-light widefield transillumination microscope. Depending on the relative aperture sizes, one block produces phase-gradient contrast while the other reduces brightfield background, allowing a full operating range between brightfield and darkfield contrast. We demonstrate graded-field imaging of neurons in a rat brain slice.

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Graded field microscopy setup.

Experimental setup: incoherent white light trans-illuminates a sample in a 6f (unit magnification) imaging line. Partial beam blocks are introduced in the illumination (top) and/or detection (bottom) apertures.